Alonzo F. Herndon included in Georgia Middle-School Education Requirement

Alonzo F. Herndon included in Georgia Middle-School Education Requirement

Atlanta Life supports Herndon Home Museum in serving as an educational resource

The argument is for the celebration of identity, exploration of interactive education and aligning your discipline with the Herndon Home Museum. Each year the Herndon Home Museum sees over 1,000 students and educators and with student tours comes non-traditional visibility to the Herndon Home Museum. Larger than this is the opportunity, in partnership with the Atlanta Public School System, to do something amazing for the 250,000+ children studying American and Georgia History each year.

Celebrate an Atlanta Identity

At the Herndon Home Museum, our vision is to advance the Herndon Legacy to educate, mentor and equip the Next Generation of Entrepreneurs. The Herndon Legacy, beginning at the turn of the 19th century, has continually engaged our neighbors in the stories of their ancestry. As an inextricable part of the community fabric, we maintain the rich and long-standing history of Historical Neighborhoods and the American Heroes our children deserve to know.

A Character portrayal of Reconstruction and its impact on American life, Mr. Herndon’s prominence and influence are enhanced by his family life. The Herndon Legacy continues today through the programs and opportunities offered by the Herndon Home Museum.

Explore Interactive Education

There’s no shortage of research indicating the benefits of museum visits for children. They can provide memorable, immersive learning experiences, provoke imagination, introduce unknown worlds and subject matter, and offer uniquely rich educational environments. The Herndon Home, first built 1908-1910 is significant because of its association with Alonzo Franklin Herndon, an African American Reconstruction Era hero who was born into slavery but whose life and legacy serves as example of the tradition of racial solidarity and self-help that epitomized the period of reconstruction (1863-1877). The Herndon Home Museum is also significant for its association with Herndon’s wife, Adrienne, who designed the residence and taught at Atlanta University, and his son Norris, who preserved the legacy of his Father, Atlanta’s first Black Millionaire, and his own contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

Designated a National Historic Landmark in 2000, the Herndon Home is a National resource of historical understanding and critical thinking that helps students become more excited about their school subjects. The Herndon Home Museum’s thematic units on Reconstruction and the New South era supports critical thinking skills by explicitly mirroring real disciplinary challenges and questions. Understanding is also reinforced through engaging group conversation and posing challenging open-ended questions. Scripted walking tours are 45 minutes and provide a guided exploration of articles and artifacts that excites.

Align your discipline

Alonzo F. Herndon is included in the 4th and 8th grades Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) for Social Studies Learning Standards, overlapping both United States History, from revolution to reconstruction, and Georgia Studies and the New South. Through outreach to teachers, administrators, and State Education partners the Herndon Home Museum can be made of service to a quarter of a million Georgia students. There are currently 181 school districts across the state of Georgia, including 2,200 schools. According to the 2018 State Department of Education enrollment report, this also includes approximately 135,000 fourth-grade and 134,000 eighth-grade students.

Fourth-Grade students across the State end their academic year in the study of the American Reconstruction Period toward the “Historical Understanding Goal SS4H6” of analysis of the details of Emancipation, Sharecropping, and Jim Crow Law and practice. These fourth-grade students are also required to meet economic understanding goals each year. These objectives are easily connected through Mr. Herndon’s famous designation as Georgia’s First Black Millionaire and artifacts from his lifetime.

Georgia Eighth-Grade students spend their entire academic year focusing on Georgia Studies. This means that 12 and 13-year-old children enrolled in GA schools and their teachers aspire to Historical Understanding standard SS6H6 on the Reconstruction on Georgia, and SS8H7 focusing on the key political, social, and economic changes that occurred in GA during the New South. This section of the State of Georgia Education Standards lists Mr. Alonzo F. Herndon, among Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois as individuals that advanced the rights of African Americans in the New South Era.

GSE Touchpoints 

  • 4th Grade – SS4H6 Analyze the effects of Reconstruction on American life.
    • Emancipation
    • Sharecropping
    • Jim Crow
  • 8th Grade – SS8H7 Evaluate key political, social, and economic changes that occurred in Georgia during the New South Era.
    • 1906 Race Riots
    • Atlanta Life Insurance Company
    • The Niagara Movement

Thank you for preserving the Herndon Legacy

In closing, the Herndon Home Museum as a National Historic Landmark and the original residence of Alonzo Herndon serves as a beacon to the persistent value of our community history. Owned and operated by the Alonzo F. and Norris B Herndon Foundation, with lead funding support from Atlanta Life Insurance Company, we are excited to continue our work-leveraging our strong legacy preserving the Herndon Legacy through an ongoing community partnership and serving as an educational resource.

 

Herndon Home Museum Tour FAQ

  • Maximum Tour Capacity is 60 students per hour
  • Tour-based study guides can be developed with advance notice
  • The Vine City MARTA station is a 5-minute walk away
  • Free private parking
  • Free Wi-Fi connections
  • Restrooms and Interior and exterior meeting and break rooms
  • Resources for local businesses and eateries